media, information, the contemporary

Publications

  • BioScope Volume 11 Issue 1, June 2020

    We’re happy to announce the publication of BioScope vol. 11. no. 1. This special issue is a step towards mapping a different landscape. It features filmmakers from Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, Myanmar, Sri Lanka and Pakistan working in fiction and, in a few instances, documentary cinema, with feature-length and short films. The focus and scope are…

  • Call for Applications – Capture All: A Sonic Investigation

    About Capture All: A Sonic Investigation How might experimental practices of sound and listening be mobilised as resources for understanding and intervening in questions of power, capture, and extraction? What aesthetic and political possibilities emerge by investigating sonic practices in relation to both domestic and urban space and their network interfaces? Throughout 2021, Liquid Architecture…

  • BioScope Volume 10 Issue 2, December 2019

    We’re happy to announce the publication of BioScope vol. 10. no. 2. This issue of Bioscope explores the televisual, whereby the mission of television goes beyond the medium and becomes a central node of information and cultural flows in the nation. Expanding on the notion of television, with its historical antecedents in print, radio, cinema and…

  • Call for Applications: Research Positions at Mecila (Maria Sibylla Merian International Centre for Advances Studies in the Humanities and Social Sciences: Conviviality-Inequality in Latin American)

    We are delighted to share the first call for applications for research positions at Mecila (Maria Sibylla Merian International Centre for Advanced Studies in the Humanities and Social Sciences: Conviviality-Inequality in Latin America) in 2020. The Centre will award 4 Junior Fellowships to candidates who have obtained a doctoral degree in humanities or social sciences…

  • BioScope Volume 10 Issue 1, June 2019

    We’re happy to announce the publication of BioScope vol. 10. no. 1. With the winds of authoritarianism sweeping across democracies in South Asia as elsewhere, the question of how to articulate the new social and political contexts in which we find ourselves is as urgent as ever. Censorship, surveillance and populism have taken on new, changed…

  • BioScope Volume 9 Issue 2, December 2018

    We’re happy to announce the publication of BioScope Vol. 9. No. 2. With every passing year, there is a mounting evidence of the inextricable links between what was once the cinema and a host of other media forms. This situation presents an interesting set of challenges to students of contemporary cinema, often requiring them to…

  • BioScope Volume 9 Issue 1, June 2018

    We’re happy to announce the publication of BioScope Vol. 9. No. 1. The articles in this issue of BioScope explore the ongoing conundrum of how to access historical spectatorship when records are scarce or non-existent. Our authors examine traces left on radio-listening in small town India, letters in Bangladeshi film magazines, emotionally charged memories linked…

  • BioScope Volume 8 Number 2, December 2017

    We’re happy to announce the publication of BioScope Vol. 8. No. 2. The articles featured in this issue of BioScope are interested in questions of how popular cinema, state-sponsored documentary, or sensational television news programs produce significant orientations of social relations and attitudes. The articles also implicitly suggest that we approach media as historically situated…

  • BioScope Volume 8 Number 1, June 2017

    We’re happy to announce the publication of BioScope vol. 8. no. 1. This issue of BioScope sets out to create conversations among visual and screen media that work with a documentary premise. Bringing together work on photography, film, and video will, we hope, help us to think about specificities and overlaps in how these different media…

  • BioScope Volume 7 Number 2, December 2016

    We’re happy to announce the publication of Bioscope vol. 7. no. 2.

    Disregarded, disreputable, provincial, seedy, illicit, cheap, scrap, or just plain trash: there are many ways to describe the forms of screen culture that populate this issue of BioScope. From Bhojpuri action cinema to film paraphernalia sold by the kilogram by the scrap-merchant; from 1980s Malayalam soft-porn to “cracked” games consoles; these forms of screen culture inhabit a netherworld of disregard, disrespect, and, often, discontent. They are produced and circulated through intersecting infrastructures of illegitimacy…